Abdominal Aortic Surgery - Causes!

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"When the wall of a blood vessel weakens, a balloon-like dilation called an aneurysm sometimes develops. This happens most often in the abdominal aorta, an essential blood vessel that supplies blood to your legs.

FAIRLY COMMON

Every year, 200,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).

A ruptured AAA is the 15th leading cause of death in the country, and the 10th leading cause of death in men older than 55.

FAMILY HISTORY IS IMPORTANT

Aneurysms run in families. If a first-degree relative has had an AAA, you are 12 times more likely to develop an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Of patients in treatment to repair an AAA, 15–25% have a first-degree relative with the same type of aneurysm."

 

To continue reading, please click the link below! 

https://vascular.org/patient-resources/vascular-conditions/abdominal-aortic-aneurysm

Breast Lump Biopsy

"When other tests show that you might have breast cancer, you will probably need to have a biopsy. Needing a breast biopsy doesn’t necessarily mean you have cancer. Most biopsy results are not cancer, but a biopsy is the only way to find out. During a biopsy, a doctor will remove cells from the suspicious area so they can be looked at in the lab to see if cancer cells are present.

There are different kinds of breast biopsies. Some use a needle, and some use an incision (cut in the skin). Each has pros and cons. The type you have depends on a number of things, like:

  • How suspicious the breast change looks
  • How big it is
  • Where it is in the breast
  • If there is more than one
  • Other medical problems you might have
  • Your personal preferences"

To continue reading, please click on the link below! 

https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/screening-tests-and-early-detection/breast-biopsy.html

Happy Thanksgiving!

"Turkey, a Thanksgiving staple so ubiquitous it has become all but synonymous with the holiday, may or may not have been on offer when the Pilgrims hosted the inaugural feast in 1621. Today, however, nearly 90 percent of Americans eat the bird—whether roasted, baked or deep-fried—on Thanksgiving, according to the National Turkey Federation. Other traditional foods include stuffing, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. Volunteering is a common Thanksgiving Day activity, and communities often hold food drives and host free dinners for the less fortunate.

Parades have also become an integral part of the holiday in cities and towns across the United States. Presented by Macy’s department store since 1924, New York City’s Thanksgiving Day parade is the largest and most famous, attracting some 2 to 3 million spectators along its 2.5-mile route and drawing an enormous television audience. It typically features marching bands, performers, elaborate floats conveying various celebrities and giant balloons shaped like cartoon characters."

To continue reading, please click on the link below! 

http://www.history.com/topics/thanksgiving/history-of-thanksgiving

Gaming Technology!

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"In March of this year, Facebook acquired the technology start-up Oculus VR, developers of the Kickstarter-funded Oculus Rift virtual reality (VR) headset, for a total of $2 billion.

News of the purchase was met with hostility from the gaming community. The Rift is considered to be the next major evolution in gaming, and the industry was suspicious of what agenda an information-dealing giant like Facebook would have for the technology.

For instance, immediately following the announced takeover, Markus Persson - creator of the award-winning world-building game Minecraft - abruptly cancelled a deal to bring Minecraft to the Rift, tweeting: "I just cancelled that deal. Facebook creeps me out.""

 

To continue reading, please click the link below! 

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/281752.php

Flu Shot!

"Why should people get vaccinated against the flu?

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Influenza is a serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Every flu season is different, and influenza infection can affect people differently, but millions of people get the flu every year, hundreds of thousands of people are hospitalized and thousands or tens of thousands of people die from flu-related causes every year. Even healthy people can get very sick from the flu and spread it to others. CDC estimates that flu-related hospitalizations since 2010 ranged from 140,000 to 710,000, while flu-related deaths are estimated to have ranged from 12,000 to 56,000. During flu season, flu viruses circulate at higher levels in the U.S. population. (“Flu season” in the United States can begin as early as October and last as late as May.) An annual seasonal flu vaccine is the best way to reduce your risk of getting sick with seasonal flu and spreading it to others. When more people get vaccinated against the flu, less flu can spread through that community.

How do flu vaccines work?

Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine.

The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. Traditional flu vaccines (called “trivalent” vaccines) are made to protect against three flu viruses; an influenza A (H1N1) virus, an influenza A (H3N2) virus, and an influenza B virus. There are also flu vaccines made to protect against four flu viruses (called “quadrivalent” vaccines). These vaccines protect against the same viruses as the trivalent vaccine and an additional B virus."

 

To continue reading, please click the link below! 

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm

Doctor of the Week: David Laird, M.D.!

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Dr. David Laird, who is board certified in general surgery, is a medical graduate of Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. His internship in general surgery was at Methodist Hospitals of Memphis; his residency was at the UT School of Medicine in Memphis. A major in the U.S. Air Force, Dr. Laird moved to Jackson after serving as the Chief of Surgical Services at Holloman Air Force Base in Alamogordo, N.M. His experience includes the full scope of general surgery and extensive endoscopy experience. He also had indepth trauma training at the Presley Memorial Trauma Center in Memphis.

The employees of Jackson-Madison County General Hospital selected Dr. Laird as the 2007 Guest Excellence Doctor of the Year. The award is based on the physician's care and concern for patients, professionalism, integrity, respect for other health care professionals, and willingness to go beyond the scope of duty. 

Doctor of the Week: Dean Currie, M.D.

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After graduating magna cum laude from Vanderbilt University with a degree in biomedical engineering and mathematics, Dr. Dean Currie earned his medical degree at UT Center for the Health Sciences in Memphis. His internship and residency were at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio where he was the Chief Surgical Resident.

The employees of Jackson-Madison County General Hospital selected Dr. Currie as the 2008 Guest Excellence Doctor of the Year. The award is based on the physician's care and concern for patients, professionalism, integrity, respect for other health care professionals, and willingness to go beyond the scope of duty.

Hernia Surgery

Hernia repair has been around for a long time. That means traditional techniques have been perfected while new options and materials have been developed. While not every technique is right for every hernia, they all have common goals: to provide the strongest repair and least chance of recurrence with the least possible discomfort and quickest recovery.

Thyroid Problems? Check Here!

Your doctor may recommend that you consider thyroid surgery for 4 main reasons:

  1. You have a nodule that might be thyroid cancer.
  2. You have a diagnosis of thyroid cancer.
  3. You have a nodule or goiter that is causing local symptoms – compression of the trachea, difficulty swallowing or a visible or unsightly mass.
  4. You have a nodule or goiter that is causing symptoms due to the production and release of excess thyroid hormone – either a toxic nodule, a toxic multinodular goiter or Graves’ disease.